Asian American Racial Identity: Complicity or Solidarity

Race Files has a new home… www.racefiles.com

Still Here… Hard At Work

The other day my dear friend, movement comrade, and Seattle-based communications wiz Joaquin Uy casually pointed out that I hadn’t posted anything on this site about our work this year. “Does ChangeLab still exist? What have you guys been doing?” Egad yes! We still exist! Sorry for the radio silence. We’ve been hard at work attacking the model minority myth and strengthening Asian American antiracist politics. If you’re not following RaceFiles, please do. That’s the most public expression of our work. We use RaceFiles to test our ideas in public, so please share it with your friends, and talk back Read more »

ChangeLab News: The year in review and a look ahead

2014 is officially here! The ChangeLab crew is very excited about this year, but first, a review of 2013 to give you some context. Last year was an inspiring one for us. We found a new home in Oakland (huzzah!) and consolidated operations there. We published a second report on our research findings, presented at conferences and gatherings like the Association of Asian American Studies and Creating Change, and did several media appearances about Asian Americans and racial politics. We built new relationships with amazing people and organizations, and launched RaceFiles with a fresh look and even fresher writers! Undeniably, one of Read more »

Love bookkeeping? Contact us!

As many of you know, ChangeLab opened an office in Oakland this summer, co-located with two amazing organizations, the Center for Media Justice and the Movement Strategy Center. The Bay Area is our new HQ and we couldn’t be happier! Now we’re looking for a super efficient bookkeeper to hit the ground running with us in the New Year. Here is the full description for the contract position, below. Please share widely and let us know if you’re interested. Resumes can be sent to admin@changelabinfo.com.  BOOKKEEPER WANTED! Purpose: ChangeLab is a grassroots political lab that uses research, cross-sector convening, and Read more »

Brand New Race Files

Dear Readers, Race Files started as an experiment. During the media blitz that followed the breakthrough performance of former New York Nicks basketball player, Jeremy Lin, I found myself mumbling under my breath about the exclusion of progressive Asian American voices in media and the almost complete absence of useful racial dialogue, particularly concerning Asian Americans. Soon, writing took the place of all that frustrated mumbling and Race Files was born, my small contribution to the discussion of race in the U.S. that I thought would be read by, at most, a few hundred friends and colleagues. That was a Read more »

Out and About with ChangeLab

For folks in the Puget Sound area, come out and join us at several upcoming events! On May 4, Wing Luke Museum is showing the documentary,  One Generation’s Time:  The Legacy of Silme Domingo & Gene Viernes.  This film screening is a great companion to our event on May 11 (see below), and Ron Chew will be there signing his book.  Wing Luke Museum, 719 S. King St., Seattle.  6:30-8:30. Free.  More information available on the Seattle Channel website. If you’re a King County employee, be sure to check out the Equity & Social Justice Forum for King County Employees on Read more »

ChangeLab is a grassroots political lab that explores how U.S. demographic change is affecting racial justice politics, with a strategic focus on Asian American identity. Through research and cross-sector convening, we seek to revitalize a contemporary Asian American politics grounded in multiracial solidarity. We also provide communications platforms to highlight the damage that racial ideas about Asian Americans have done to the broader racial justice movement – by reinforcing anti-black racism, justifying U.S. Empire, and marginalizing Asian American struggles. Learn more about us »

Research Paper The Importance of Asian Americans? It’s Not What You think. Future Directions in the Racial Justice Movement. Read more »